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VIRAT    Distributed Robotics    Neural Networks    3D Robot Vision    Truck Monitoring 
VIRAT
May 2011-Dec 2013

Overview

I have been working with Dr. Supratik Mukhopadhyay and a research group at LSU on a project funded under the VIRAT (Video Image Retrieval and Analysis Tool) program of DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) to analyze surveillance video and detect certain activities, intended to be used by the military to identify security threats.

More information about this project in general can be found on Wikipedia, and some of our work with object tracking can be seen here.

Applications
  • military
  • surveillance
  • video searching
  • security
Distributed Robotics
2006-present

Related:
  Science Fair
    2007 project
Overview

Small intelligent robots with complex interactions may be used for a variety of applications which are not well suited for traditional robotics. Recent work has included developing a design incorporating hardware neural networks to develop societal communication and group feedback. A highly module approach allows each module to give each other feedback inter- and intra- robot.

Auditory, visual, and other sensors may share information with the higher level neural systems. If modules are removed or damaged, the neural systems can learn new ways to compensate for the loss of the module. A proof-of-concept demonstration will be created in the near future with audio and visual sensors, and simple wheeled locomotion.

Applications
  • military
  • exploration
  • surveillance
  • telecommunications
VLSI Neural Networks
2004-present

Related:
  Science Fair
    2006 project
    2005 project
Overview

Recently work has included a general-purpose configurable mixed-signal CMOS VLSI neural network. Several design ideas have included fully-analog routing signals, as well as pulsed digital signals. The ideal design would have the processing asynchronous and transparent to the user, and routability similar to that of an FPGA programmable logic design. Using pulsed-signal routing, a highly-dense multi-chip layout would be possible for a large number of neural elements.

The current design is very biologically-inspired, with many aspects of the design mimicking their counterparts in the human brain. The research is currently continuing, with a prototype chip to be fabricated in the near future using the TSMC 0.35µm CMOS process.

Applications
  • robotics
  • computing
  • manufacturing
  • sensors
  • automotive
3D Robot Vision
2002-2005, 2006-present

Related:
  Science Fair
    2005 project
    2004 project
    2003 project
Overview

In this work, I have been trying to create a three-dimensional visual system for robotics that is capable of fast mapping and recognition of objects. This work has involved creating vector-based alternatives to the inherently slow depth-maps which are currently used for this problem. Designs have included distributed microcontroller image processing, as well as a recent FPGA implementation of the necessary image processing algorithms.

This work is now continuing, for a possible application in a distributed robotics system. Small cell-phone cameras will be used for the image sensors, along with an FPGA and Neural Network for the image processing.

Applications
  • robotics
  • manufacturing
  • exploration
  • mapping
Concrete Truck Monitoring
2004-2008
Overview

As contract work for Auton Engineering, Ltd., I have done microcontroller and Microsoft Visual Basic programming in the development of software for cellular tracking and monitoring of concrete trucks for the Hawk Eye project. GPS data is transmitted through a wireless internet link to the base station, using a variety of cellular CDMA and GSM networks. Dispatch scheduling and driver communication has been a part of this project. Advanced networking has also been made possible, for the use of multiple base station computers.

Applications
  • truck dispatch
  • vehicle monitoring
  • vehicle tracking

Copyright © 2011-2013 Malcolm Stagg